Samantha Boshnack

composition | trumpet

EXPLODING SYNDROME

Exploding Syndrome One Sheet

The Sam Boshnack Quintet debut record “Exploding Syndrome” is now available for sale at all major online retailers.

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WHAT THE PRESS IS SAYING…..
“Intrepid trumpeter and composer Samantha Boshnack’s Exploding Syndrome is one of those delightful, surprising discoveries that makes writing about jazz so rewarding. The explorative and intriguing record balances innovation with a strong melodic sense and the intimate ambience of the quintet with a definite dramatic flair…..Boshnack and her quintet are phenomenally innovative musicians with a unique signature sound that owes as much to their, on the spot, ingenuity as to Boshnack’s original writing.  Exploding Syndrome is a testament to their exceptional talents as individuals and, thanks to Boshnack’s leadership, as a cohesive sympathetic group. It is also a portent of the brilliance that will hopefully continue to come from Samantha Boshnak’s pen and horn. ” (Hrayr Attarian / All About Jazz)

> Read more: http://www.allaboutjazz.com/php/article.php?id=46878#.UzUEF14W5PM

“In which we find Seattle’s jazz trumpet ace stepping away from her role as leader of B’shnorkestra and debuting her quintet, this set shows that she might have gotten her jazz education at Bard but heading off for Seattle instead of downtown gives her music a different flavor. Loaded with the kind of switchbacks you find in 70s era Carla Bley works, Boshnack’s unconventionality gives left leaning and progressive jazz new voicings that work well. Proving she has it on the ball to be a triple threat as a writer/player/leader, Boshnack is easily the poster girl for solid, nu modern jazz. This is a wonderful ride through not too distant left field.” (Chris Spector/Midwest Record)

“(Samantha) contains her and her band mates’ wildness within carefully balanced compositions supported by tight harmonies and demanding rhythms. Lyricism and sardonic wit coexist in the title track with its floating Dawn Clement piano solo, a howling Beth Fleenor vocal like something from the sound track of a Rob Zombie movie, and a Moussorgskian fanfare. In her primary role, Fleenor solos smoothly on clarinet and bass clarinet. Boshnack’s “Suite for Seattle’s Royal Court,” particularly in the final movement, has moments of majesty. It has others of whimsy. The suite encompasses further impressive piano playing by Clement, pastoral Fleenor clarinet and a nicely sculpted Isaac Castillo bass solo. In all tracks, Castillo and the young drummer Max Wood are an effective rhythm team. Boshnack’s writing and her energy make her progress worth tracking.” (Doug Ramsey/Arts Journal)

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“A sound like no other – Samantha Boshnack walks her own path. Whether blasting through the alternative sonic explorations of her 14-piece B’shnorkestra or fronting her own Quintet, Boshnack’s compositional voice pulses with vitality. The whole album plays like one long suite, the divisions of which reveal Boshnack’s playfulness and sense of humor before one hears a single note.  For a taste of where jazz is going give a listen to Sam Boshnack. She trumpets in the new age!” (5 stars / Grady Harp / Amazon)

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“Original, introspective, interesting, harmonically rich, progressive yet accessible.” (Brad Stone/ Soul and Jazz “Creative Source”)

“On this disc, the band sounds huge, almost orchestral, but also lithe. You could almost say this is chamber jazz, but there’s too much modernity to honestly describe it that way….these are pieces that can only be conceived by someone with a intimate understanding of many music forms; Boshnack’s exposure ranges from Bach to Balkan…..Boshnack’s randy side comes out fully on the title track. This schizo song gets off with a stuttering beat and a rock demeanor, Clement’s Wurlitzer resembling an electric guitar, but also punctuated by quiet solo piano moments. The song picks up steam again, culminating in some female Cookie Monster growling from Fleenor followed by a Mexican trumpet harmony. Yep, it’s a trip.” (somethingelsereviews.com)

> read more: http://somethingelsereviews.com/2014/03/14/sam-boshnack-quintet-exploding-syndrome-2014/

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“The songs on Explosion Syndrome traverse a span of emotions, from doleful ballad to simmering groove…The music bursts with color – Boshnack’s trumpet sallies with Beth Fleenor’s clarinet, Dawn Clement understates her elegant piano and provides occasional electric filigree with Wurlitzer while drummer Max Wood and bassist Isaac Castillo walk a subtly shifting rhythmic foundation.” (Jonathan Zwickel / City Arts Magazine)
> read more: http://www.cityartsonline.com/articles/far-out-close

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“A collection of short ostinato bass figures, choice pianism, sweet and spicy bass clarinet, and layered rhythmic dynamism…On Exploding Syndrome, Boshnack has made way for the voices of colleagues to shine – Dawn Clement in deep understanding of compositions; Castillo with anchored sound and fine arco moments; Fleenor with driving, bass clarinet counter point and a great recorded take of her improvised Patton-esque vocals” (Schraepfer Harvey / Earshot Jazz)
> read more: http://www.earshot.org/Publication/profiles/profile_14_03_Boshnack.html

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“great, adventurous, nicely scored music. Definitely jazz but also definitely not *only* jazz (i.e. the jazz police do NOT approve!). But I do. And so will you. A year ago I had never heard of her; now within a year she has released two of my favorite recent jazz releases. A real talent to watch. Highly recommended.” (Wayside Music)
> read more: http://www.waysidemusic.com/Music-Products/Boshnack-Sam-Exploding-Syndrome__SBQ-spc-001.aspx

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“the quality of the writing puts this one a notch above the rest. Boshnack’s compositions are able to effectively convey a mood, be it reflective or more agitated….. the front line of trumpet and clarinet/bass clarinet creates a rich texture, and there are times where distorted electric piano is laid on top of what sounds like prepared piano….there’s an extra dose of energy and edge, topped off on the title track with vocalizations that sound like a ninja on crack.” (Improvised Blog)
> read more: http://improvisedblog.blogspot.com/2014/03/sam-boshnack-quintet-exploding-syndrome.html

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“This sparkling debut by the Sam Boshnack Quintet showcases the Seattle trumpeter’s witty pen as well as the considerable instrumental skills of her band mates. Beth Fleenor, who just might be my favorite clarinetist these days, plays with brilliant clarity; Dawn Clement’s spare, sweet lines will surprise listeners who know her for a denser tumble; bassist Isaac Castillo’s matches a woody, warm tone with smart lines; and drummer Max Wood, whose rim-tickling is showcased throughout, plays with musical aplomb.Boshnack’s spare, smart writing creates moods from sprightly to ceremonial to explosive (per the title track) and features lots of air between the instruments (with piano often laying out) and delicious trumpet blends with Bb clarinet and bass clarinet.” ( Paul DeBarros / Seattle Times)
> read more:  http://blogs.seattletimes.com/soundposts/2014/03/24/sam-boshnacks-exploding-syndrome-sparkles-new-recordings/

Even on the slower pieces, like “Ashcloud“, the energy for playing and expression is “there”… Sam’s trumpet/flugelhorn work is flawless on this sonic adventure from the great Northwest! The entire quintet shines on the 7:14 “Dormant“, with a place for each instrument & fluid movement all the way through. It was actually the shortest piece on the CD, “Juba“, that got my vote for favorite of the eight tunes offered up for your sonic enjoyment, though… this one MOVES! Any way you listen, this vibrant and totally talented group definitely merits the MOST HIGHLY RECOMMENDED I’m giving them, as well as an “EQ” (energy quotient) rating of 4.98. (Dick Metcalf/Improvijazzation Nation)

“We last read of trumpeter/flugelhornist Samantha (Sam) Boshnack in the review of B’shnorkestra’s Go to Orange, a large ensemble effort whereas Exploding Syndrome is quintetual. No problems there at all, dear reader, as the stripped-down format gives us far more in terms of laying bare the strange and beguiling architectures the swiftly rising composer-player erects in varying shades of jazz, chamber, neoclassical, and pastoralique arbors…. everywhere in this release, one encounters nothing but a constant interplay between progressivisms of, and smiling perversions upon, standard manneristic staples, now broken down to better serve nu-stylistic ends. Ahhhhhhhhhh, we so much need that!…such discs as Exploding Syndrome and such composers as Samantha Boshnack force new crenellations into the brain while taunting the amygdala and limbic systems. Great unit here, y’all. ECM should lately do so well, hm? And, hey, that bizarre and unsettling but wry vocalese Orc-speak by Fleenor in Exploding Syndrome? Way the hell too cool. More, please, next time out: Zappa’s listening from the grave.” (Mark S Tucker/FAME Review) Read More

“Above average is how I would characterize SAM BOSHNACK’s recording EXPLODING SYNDROME. I am familiar with Ms. Boshnack from her work with the Reptet recordings of a few years back. Boshnack brings together a quintet for 8 carefully crafted originals by the leader. These are the kind of constructs that have interest in of themselves, I was engaged by the mixture of composition and improvisation. Not an open blowing date— this is a composers date.”  (Robert Rusch/CADENCE MAGAZINE)

“… the SBQ blends influences from a wide swath of musical territory.  One hears West African grooves on “Dormant” and “Juba”, slinky New Orleans rhythms on “Suite For Seattle’s Royal Court, Movement 3”, heavy metal scat singing on the title track followed by an overdubbed trumpet choir on the title track, and classical melody on “Xi”….  “Ashcloud” may have an ominous title but is a touching ballad built upon a short piano figure.  The melody is stated by trumpet and clarinet before Ms. Boshnack creates an emotionally rich solo that stays in the middle range of the instrument.  Ms. Clement also creates a lovely solo before Ms. Fleenor plays the short piano figure on her instrument in support of a handsome bowed bass solo.  The performance shows the strength of this ensemble, how they listen and support each other, and how no one instrument or instrumentalist dominates the music – no surprise, as that is how they approach this material throughout….  This music has fire, passion, melody, and excellent interactions – you should listen.”  (Richard B. Kamins/Step Tempest) Read More

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